The Futuristic Lamborghini: A Perfect Blend of Looks, Tech Driving Pleasure, Unique Experience And Performance

Lamborghini concept car

If you thought the Lamborghini Sian was out of this world, wait until you meet the most futuristic Lamborghini. It is a vehicle that is not for the faint-hearted, neither by its looks nor by performance. Many people think that it exists only online and in video games, but the truth is, it doesn’t.

Enthusiasts call it the Lambo V12 Vision Grand Turismo. It was initially designed for Grand Turismo, and Lamborghini engineers turned it from a virtual concept to a real-life marvel. With a hybridized 12 cylinder engine that uses advanced super-capacitor technology and an appearance like an alien ship, the car is a dream to see.

What is the Lambo V12 Vision GT?

According to Lamborghini, the Lambo V12 Vision GT is a concept vehicle that takes whatever the advanced supercar manufacturer has to offer to another level. It was made the for PS4 game Grand Turismo SR. However, the concept has become a reality, and a single car prototype has been produced for the real world.

The car flaunts the Lamborghini DNA with a multitude of additional futuristic traits. It wears a unique silhouette, emphasizes a single-seat layout, and is equipped with the same powertrain on the Sian FKP 37. Still, the added aerodynamics, carefully sculpted finishes, and a unique design that seems to be part Formula 1 and part NASCAR on the Vision GT, make the two cars look miles apart.

It Reminds Us of a Fighter Jet from Outside

Futuristic Lamborghini concept fighter jet comparison
Futuristic Lamborghini concept fighter jet comparison

The car still wears something from the historical Gandini design, which means that it shares something with historical Lamborghinis. But with all four corners appearing disconnected from the body, the car features a unique, floating cabin, reminding us of the canopy of a fighter jet.

You cannot miss the huge wing at the rear of the vehicle, which houses the rare signature Y-shaped taillight, covering most of the rear end. The left and right legs of the Y end in the split spoiler, or wings. The six-exhaust pipes are arranged in two sets and sit low on the rear. A unique silver bezel seems to run from the rear toward the undercarriage.

Towards the side, we have hexagonal windows that cover the full height of the car. They are designed to improve outside visibility from a cabin that is surrounded by the fenders and the wings. But the most prominent features on the side are the giant wheels, which are snuggly fitted into the vehicle’s body. There is futuristic creasing and slicing all over.

The front portrays the cabin sitting separately on the vehicle chassis. The vast air intakes are visible below the cabin, as are many suspension parts and control arms. The headlights are also Y-shaped and comprise thin strips of LEDs, adding to the car’s futuristic appearance.

There are no doors in the car. Let’s allow that to sink in. To enter and exit, the front section of the cockpit can be raised, and then the driver can slide in and out. It is not the most convenient way, but it works well for the design.

But it is a Futuristic Spaceship on the Inside

Futuristic Lamborghini cockpit
Image credit by Lamborghini

The cabin is far more futuristic than what we saw on the outside. There is a one-of-its-kind holographic display inside, which replaces the traditional instrument cluster, and displays information in a more realistic and innovative way. Lamborghini predicts that this holographic system will be possible in the near future, say at least ten years.

The car will also be equipped with an intelligent system that will monitor the track you are driving on and your driving pattern. This system will give you real-time advice on how to maximize performance and minimize your lap times. We presume that these updates will be delivered through the hologram system and accompanied by voice commands.

More Pilot than a Racer

Futuristic Lamborghini interior
Image credit by Lamborghini

It is more than just looks that make this car feel like an aircraft than something designed to run on the road. It starts with the driver getting in the car. The cabin opens up much like a canopy of a fighter jet. The driver climbs into the seat, and the futuristic canopy closes around them. All driving controls are located in the advanced steering wheel that is shaped like an aircraft yoke.

The mostly-glass canopy gives you a wide-angle view of your surroundings. Look over your right shoulder, and you will see the right-wing; similarly, the left-wing will be over your left shoulder. It is undoubtedly more of a fighter jet than a car.

Will It Handle Like a Fighter Jet?

The Lambo V12 is supposedly powered by the same engine found on the Lamborghini Sian. According to Car Buzz, the engine can produce over 819 horsepower and takes the Sian above 60 mph in just 2.8 seconds with a top speed of 220 mph.

The V12 Vision is much lighter and seats only one, so we expect it to be much faster than the Sian. The Sian has a weight to power ratio of 4.4 pounds per hp. But the Vision is expected to have a weight to power ratio of 2.4 pounds per hp, so it is naturally expected to be very fast off the line and in terms of top speed.

Last Few Words

Lamborghini still keeps a lot of the features of this vehicle hidden from the public eye. Consider yourself lucky if you see one of these vehicles anytime soon because there is only one of its kind. It is a far-stretched dream of every car gamer and enthusiast to see one of these, let alone drive one.

The car is a perfect blend of looks, technology, driving pleasure, unique experience, performance, and everything else a car enthusiast could ask for. It combines the experience of a fighter jet with a road car, which is an innovative concept like no other.

Lamborghini claims that the prototype hologram system alone can take at least ten years to function fully. This continues to puzzle us if we will ever see this car on the tracks in the real world. Do you think Lamborghini will start producing this vehicle, and how long do you expect it to take before we see this as a production car?

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